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Tuesday, October 19, 2010

ARE YOU READY FOR A SMALL TASTE OF WHO'S HOT?





IT'S HHHHEEEERRRREEEE!!!!!

DO WE HAVE YOUR EMAIL?

Friday, October 15, 2010

IT'S ABOUT TO GO DOWN......ARE YOU READY???

IT'S ABOUT TO GO DOWN!!!
                  ARE YOU READY????

WHO can you expect?
                 Expect the Unexpected from the People in the background as they work to Show not Please, What a Revolutionary Concept.

WHAT is WHO'S HOT? & WHO'S NOT!?
                 THE FIRST ALL DIGITAL MAGAZINE FOR ALL THAT IS HOT IN HIPHOP.

WHAT is our mission?
                 To highlight those around the world who "Pay it Forward" by helping others.

WHAT can you expect?
                 Being Blessed by the Stories of Others. Excitement. Honesty. A Breathe of Fresh Air.

WHEN?
                 Release Date is OCTOBER 19, 2010
WHERE?
                WE ARE WORLD WIDE!!! SO ANYWHERE YOU HAVE ACCESS TO THE INTERNET, YOU WILL FIND WHO'S HOT? & WHO'S NOT! DIGITAL MAGAZINE!!!


HOLLA ATCHA GURL...

HERE IS A SNEAK PREVIEW OF THE FEATURED ARTISTS IN THE OCTOBER 2010 ISSUE...

WHO can you expect?

                Expect the Unexpected from the People in the background as they Work to HELP not Please... What a Revolutionary Concept.

SIT BACK AND ENJOY!!!





GO DJ J-WEEZIE

RESOLUTION WRECKORDS

NOFACE SHADOWS


SESS 4-5

Fourth Katrina Anniversary, 2009

PROBLUMZ OF BEATSHOP

A PlayStation Cost More Than A Choppa


WORLD RENOWN VIOLINIST, KAREN BRIGGS
STAY TUNED FOR HER COVER





WHO'S HOT? & WHO'S NOT!
I CAN'T WAIT!!!!!

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

STAY TUNED FOR THE WHWN DIGITAL MAGAZINE

STAY TUNED FOR THE WHWN DIGITAL MAGAZINE






Dear HipHop Family,


It's just mia and I want to personally Thank You ALL for Honoring me with Your Blessings and for helping Who's Hot? & Who's Not! gain such Internet presence. WE'RE ALL GROWN UP LOOK OUT FOR US ON BLAST TV SAN DIEGO! UNTIL THEN STAY TUNED FOR A PREVIEW OF ALL THE PLACES THAT ALLOWED WHWN TO CRASH DA SPOT... WITH GOD ON MY SIDE, I HAVE TRULY BEEN AND STAY BLESSED.

It was all a bllluuuurrrrr....... namaste
Enhanced by Zemanta

Friday, July 9, 2010

WHWN Asks What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop, DJ J-Weezie says, "Some of these Rappers...Out there...Just talk About Anything!"

Yes, we are still living BP's nightmare as today is Day 81 of the Oil gusher that is blackening the Gulf Coast. We have some great highlights though, like Chris Brown's moving 2010 B.E.T. Awards' Michael Jackson Tribute that brought us all to tears. Then the U.S. actually showed up in the F.I.F.A. World Cup South Africa tournament, but was ousted. Yet the most important factor is the economic dollars generated for South Africa with the worlds' attention turned to it. Now, we're fresh out of the 2010 Essences Festival here are still rockin hard and holdin it down. I got another GO DJ for ya!!! GO DJ J-Weezie is another one of New Orleans' HOTTEST DJ'S and he Blessed us with his Thoughts on HipHop.

WHWN ASKS WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON HIPHOP, DJ J-WEEZIE SAYS,

I Break music. I will say it again. Yes. I Break Music but never Garbage...Some of these Rappers...Out there...Just talk About Anything!
Here are DJ J-Weezie's Thoughts on HipHop...


mia: What is your stage name?
     DJ J-W:  My stage name is GO DJ J-Weezie.
mia:  Is the music industry your primary job?
     DJ J-W:  No it is not Music is My Love, my primary job is the Air Force.
mia:  Interesting. A defense man by day and GO DJ J-Weezie by night....interesting.
mia:  In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
     DJ J-W:  I’m a GO DJ.
mia:  If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
     DJ J-W: Hip Hop, Rap, R&B, Bounce…to be honest anything that is hot and worth breaking.
mia: {smiling} Sounds like me. 

mia:  How long have you been in this profession?
     DJ J-W:  I been Djing since 2000.
mia:  What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
     DJ J-W:  HipHop well music as a whole is very close to me. I always was around music being in the marching band and also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Professional Music Fraternity Inc.,
mia:  What is HipHop to you?
     DJ J-W:  HipHop is the spoken word of ones way of life, his/her struggle with the curves balls that life throw your way. HipHop is soul and the movement that we face growing up.
mia:  Thank you for that deep insight.  Of course you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
     DJ J-W:  Yes it has a purpose to me growing up HipHop was that message, the way of life of many. HipHop taught us what the media as a whole was trying to hide.
mia:  Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
     DJ J-W:  Yes I am, because HipHop has a strong message some may disagree/agree with the message but to me HipHop is a real life story.
mia:  When do you think HipHop was born?
     DJ J-W:  Well can't say exactly when is was born because it was before I came into the world (1979) but like GO DJ E.F. Cuttin started before “ 1973, when Kool Herc was rocking park jams in the BX…” I can say I remember listening to the movement within Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Flash.
mia:  What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
     DJ J-W:  Well as a DJ we all know HipHop started out as DJ’s rocking the beat, scratching, and beat juggling… The MC’s came along later to hype the crowd then the lyrics started kicking in more.
mia:  How often to you think about HipHop?
     DJ J-W:  All the time HipHop is in me.
mia:  AMEN!  Amen, Brautha.  How long do you think HipHop will be around?
     DJ J-W:  HipHop would be around a long time. As long as we don’t accept some this garbage these rappers are puttin out now of days.
mia:  Well spoken.  Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
     DJ J-WRappers Delight…My dad played it over and over.

mia:  How did it make you feel?
     DJ J-W:  I was like wow at that age didn’t understand it but it had to be cool my dad was playing it.
mia:  {smiling}
mia:  What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
     DJ J-W:  (no order) Eric B. & Rakim-Eric B is President, Public Enemy-Welcome to the Terrordome, Special Ed-I’m the Magnificent.
mia:  Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
     DJ J-W:  Really don’t have a favorite I enjoy it all
mia:  Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
     DJ J-W:  *Laughing* There are a lot but I give you a two names they call themselves HipHop/Rap artist Soulja Boy and Plies.
mia:  Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
     DJ J-W:  It can be but at the same time most Rap to me is not….Some of these rappers that’s out there now of day just talk about anything, they have no meaning behind the music and HipHop has a meaning.
mia:  What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
     DJ J-W:  Get back to the lyrics and stop making this garbage we hearing on the radio.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
     DJ J-W:  Positive in our mindset but very negative in the media….HipHop to the media always portrait guns and drugs.
mia:  Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
     DJ J-W:  Because that as a society is what we accept…Females talk about they don’t wanna be called certain names but yet you floss your body around and accept what is seen in the videos without voicing an opinion on things.
mia:  Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
     DJ J-W:  I still believe HipHop just has that positive effect on everyone.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
     DJ J-W: Very much so just look at the big picture…Most of your clothing line is HipHop
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a commodity, and why?
     DJ J-W:  Very much so. Prime example just look at how many artists are endorsed by some type of alcohol drink right now, corporations know HipHop sells.
mia:  What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
     DJ J-W:  I love it but you do realize HipHop has expanded just look at what Akon has done.
mia:  Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
     DJ J-W:  Yes it has HipHop is global no matter how you view it HipHop is still spoken word it is the way of life.


mia:  Why is HipHop used worldwide to advertise a wide variety of commodities?
     DJ J-W:  I think because the Music was always the Movement.
mia:  Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
     DJ J-W:  I kinda stated this earlier but yea it really does. The media will never show the Truth Behide HipHop I think because of the race the Media always stereotype HipHop to violence.
mia:  {is diggin the emphasis added with the caps} 
mia:  Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
     DJ J-W:  It has always been under attack by the unknown, people worst fear is the unknown so therefore it gets stereotyped.
mia:  Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
     DJ J-W:  I do believe so.
mia:  Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
     DJ J-W:  I think because people of this time never want to hear the positive.
mia:  Interesting...
mia:  Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
     DJ J-W:  Radio stations to me is not for music, Radio is advertisements that’s how they get paid.
mia:  Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
     DJ J-W:  I have never….Yes. I Break music I will say it again. Yes. I Break Music but never garbage.
mia: Amen.
mia:  What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground?” series?
     DJ J-W:  Yes I have and I love the information.
mia:  Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
     DJ J-W:  I see the vision and it’s a very good look.
mia: Thank You and Namaste.  {Please press play to hear the SHOUT OUT to Mia & WHWN}


You can find DJ J-Weezie:
Facebook: DJ J-Weezie
Twitter: @DJ J-Weezie
MySpace: GODJ J-Weezie  

Namaste


Friday, June 11, 2010

WHWN Asks, What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop? MIZERY DA BEAST says, "I FEEL ANYBODY CAN RAP! THEY HAVE LIKE A MILLION RAPPERS OUT HERE!"




While 59 days into BP's Oil Spill, Louisiana is showing America her strength, yet again.  We've seen a state, an economy, a way of life battered and beaten and yet she still pushes forward.  I love all my tours home; where my folks are living, grinding, pushing through and making a whole lotta sumin out of nutin.  We've been Blessed to have other NO artists grace us with their thoughts on HipHop.  Frankie "Mizery Da Beast" Dennis says,


I FEEL ANYBODY CAN RAP. THEY HAVE LIKE A MILLION RAPPERS OUT HERE, BUT EVERYONE CANT MAKE REAL MUSIC AND DATZ HIP HOP TO ME. REAL MUSIC.


Here's another great soul, as I always promise, uncut and straight like you want it!


mia: What is your stage name? What is your government n
MBD: MIZERY DA BEAST!!! FRANKIE DENNIS.
mia: Is the music industry your primary job?
MDB: NO, NOT NOW. YET BUT IT IS MY MAIN FOCUS & I FEEL THIS IS MY CALLING.
mia: In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
MDB: IM SIGNED TO J.CLARKMANAGEMENT.
mia: If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
MDB: IMMA ARTIST AND MY CONTENT VARIES.
mia: How long have you been in this profession?
MDB: I BEEN RAPPING SINCE 1999, BUT STARTED TAKING IT SERIOUS IN 2003.
mia: What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
MDB: MY RELATIONSHIP WITH IT IS SPECIAL CUZ I FEEL LIKE WITH OUT THIS I WOULD BE DEAD OR IN JAIL. LIKE SOME OF MY FRIENDS MUSIC GAVE ME A WAY OUT A WAY TO EXPRESS MY SELF AND STAY OUT THE STREETS.
mia: That's real deep. What is HipHop to you?
MDB: HIPHOP IS MORE THAN JUS RAPPING AND THE GLAMOR THEY PORTRAY. NOW IT'S ART. IT'S A WAY TO EXPRESS YOUR SELF THROUGH WORDS IN A POSITIVE WAY.


mia: Do you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
MDB: EVERYTHING HAS A PURPOSE WHETHER ITS GOOD OR BAD, BUT YES I THINK IT HAS A PURPOSE. NOW A DAYS THE MESSAGE IS KINDA FUZZY THOUGH.
mia: Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
MDB: YES!!!! FROM THE DAYS OF THEM BATTLING TO THE WAY THEY USE TO RECORD OUT OF THEY HOUSE AND PUSH THEIR MUSIC, THEMSELVES ,THEY DIDNT NEED A BIG LABEL TO BACK THEM AND IT GIVES ME HOPE STILL ...... CUZ DATZ HOW MOST ARTIST START OFF BATTLING TO GET A NAME AND RECORDING FROM HOME.
mia: When do you think HipHop was born?
MDB: WOW!!! UMMM LOL IMMA YOUNGEN I KNO SOMEWHERE IN DA 70'S.
mia: What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
MDB: IT STARTED FROM DISC JOCKEYS PLAYING MUSIC, MEN AND WOMEN BREAK DANCING TO THE BEAT, BEAT BOXING AND BATTLE RAPPING.


mia: How often to you think about HipHop?
MDB: LOL!! IS DAT A TRICK QUESTION? WHEN DO I NOT THINK BOUT IT. I LIVE IT! BREATH IT! WHEN IM SLEEP DATZ, WAT I DREAM BOUT!
mia: How long do you think HipHop will be around?
MDB: HIP HOP WILL BE AROUND FOREVER!
mia: Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
MDB: LOL! NA NOT REALLY.
mia: What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
MDB: BONE THUGS N HARMONY CROSS ROADS A SPECIAL SONG TO ME, NAS ETHER, THE LYRICAL CONTENT WUZ CRAZY AND 2PAC KEEP YA HEAD UP.


mia: Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
MDB: WELL AS HOW NOW T.I. JUST HIS LYRICAL CAPABILITY SWAGG BUSINESS MIND SET AND HIS DEDICATION TO HIS TEAM AND TO HIS MUSIC.
mia: Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
MDB: OFF TOP GUCCI MANE AND OJ DA JUICE MAN.
mia: Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
MDB: I FEEL ANYBODY CAN RAP. THEY HAVE LIKE A MILLION RAPPERS OUT HERE, BUT EVERYONE CANT MAKE REAL MUSIC AND DATZ HIP HOP TO ME. REAL MUSIC. SO, NO ITS NOT THE SAME.
mia: What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
MDB: UMMM DATZ A GOOD ONE!!! WELL, I WOULDNT CHANGE I THING I LOVE HIP HOP.
mia: Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
MDB: I FEEL IT'S USED BOTH WAYS CAUSE WE HAVE SONGS DAT INFORM YOU WITH POSITIVE INFO AND SOME SONGS DAT MAKE U THINK CALLING FEMALES BITCHES AND HOES HUSTLING AND CARRYING A GUN IS THE WAY TO GO.


mia: Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
MDB: POINT BLANK. PERIOD. DATZ WAT SELLS. DATZ WAT PEOPLE WANNA SEE.
mia: Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
MDB: IT HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY TO RELATE TO.
mia: Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
MDB: YESS!!! LIKE I SAID IN DA LAST QUESTION IT HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY TO RELATE TO.
mia: Do you think HipHop is a commodity, and why?
MDB: YES!!! IT'S ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE WORLD WITH OUT HIP HOP MOST OF THE THINGS WE SEE AND WEAR MAY NOT EXSIST.
mia: What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
MDB: IT GIVES ME GOOSE BUMPS AND MAKE ME PROUD TO SEE HOW FOR WE HAVE COME.
mia: Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
MDB: YES! CUZ WE HAVE NO BOUNDARIES. SKY IS THE LIMIT.
mia: Why is HipHop used worldwide to advertise a wide variety of commodities?
MDB: CHILDREN HAVE ROLE MODELS AND WANNA BE LIKE THERE ROLE MODELS; WEAR WHAT THEY WEAR HIPHOP IS THE FASHION STATEMENT DAT THE WORLD FOLLOWS.
mia: Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
MDB: YES!!! CUZ THE MEDIA ONLY SHOW U THE NEGATIVE ITS ALL ABOUT RATINGS GOOD GUY'S DONT SELL IN THE MEDIA.



mia: Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
MDB: YES ITS UNDER ATTACK BY THE MEDIA AND PARENTS, LIKE MY GRANDMA SAYS "ITS A BUNCH OF NONSENSE THEY TALKING AND DNT NEED 2 BE AROUND."
mia: Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
MDB: YES. BUT IN DA AGE WE LIVE IN VERY HARD CUZ ALL THEY WORRY BOUT IS RINGTONE NUMBERS AND PEOPLE DONT BUY CD'S ANYMORE THEY BOOTLEGGEN.
mia: Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
MDB: IMAGE THEIR SCARED OF. WAT THEIR IMAGE WILL BE. PLAIN AND SIMPLE! IF THE FEMALES LIKE THE RECORD MEN WILL PLAY IT DJ WILL SPIN IT.
mia: That seems to be a recurring answer in this series. Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
MDB: RADIO STATIONS AND LABELS ARE PIMPS AND MONEY HUNGRY. THEY DONT CARE IF U HOT OR NOT. IF U NOT MAKING THEM NO 1 AT THAT POINT AND TIME, NO MATTER HOW MUCH U MADE IN DA PAST, TO THE BENCH U GO!
mia: Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
MDB: NO. I HAVENT BUT I FEEL LIKE IT'S WRONG CAUSE NO MATTER THE QUALITY IF U HAVE THE MONEY U GET SPINN'S, DAT LIFE I GUESS.
mia: What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground?” series? Have you joined WHWN’s blog, if not why?
MDB: IT WUZ VERY INFORMATIVE AND IM JOINING NOW.
mia: Thanks! Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
MDB: IT FELT LIKE MIA WUZ TOUCHING ON SOME IMPORTANT ISSUES AND I WANTED TO GIVE MY OPINION.
mia: Thanks, that really means a lot to me.
You can find Mizery Da Beast:
Facebook
Twitter

Friday, May 7, 2010

WHWN Asks What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop? DJ Soul Sister says, "It Is the Culture that Brought About Rap Music"



The interviews have been all male. So finally, we had a lady brave enough to step up and let us know her thoughts on HipHop. She is a New Orleans local, who by my standards has helped keep the soul, funk and groove sound well alive and booming in The Big Easy. Without further delay, here is DJ Soul Sister and her thoughts on HipHop. 

by Zack Smith


"queen of rare groove" * new orleans * usa

mia: What is your stage name?
DJSS: DJ Soul Sister
mia: Is the music industry your primary job?
DJSS: No.
mia: In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
DJSS: I have been lucky to work for non-profits that support arts, culture & music. During times that I have been unemployed, then, yes, the music industry has been my primary job for several months to a year at a time.
mia: If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
DJSS: DJ artist specializing in rare groove, deep funk, classic old school soul & R&B, and true school/old school hip hop.
mia: How long have you been in this profession?
DJSS: 15 years
mia: What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
DJSS: I was a pre-teenager during what's known as the "Golden Age of Hip Hop" in the late 1980s and have always loved the culture and music even before then. I have been collecting funk music (vinyl) since I was a little girl and began paying attention to learning about the sources of rap music samples during that time of the late 1980s when I was buying lots of rap records.
mia: What is HipHop to you?
DJSS: Hip hop to me is always the 4 elements: dj, breaking/b-boy/b-girl, graffiti & MC. This is a static definition to some, but I choose to uphold the definition in respect for the culture.

MARC PAGANI 2008

mia: Do you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
DJSS: n/a
mia: Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
DJSS: Most definitely, because I learned about lots of funk samples through hip hop. Hip hop did not entirely introduce me to the original funk & soul music, but it did play a role.
mia: When do you think HipHop was born?
DJSS: 1973.
mia: What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
DJSS: I'd say that hip hop is the culture that brought about rap music. The music of hip hop was influenced by the landscape of the Bronx, where hip hop was born, and the musical genres of funk, soul, disco and reggae (with the Jamaican sound systems & toasting). You would not have hip hop without those genres.
mia: How often to you think about HipHop?
DJSS: n/a
mia: How long do you think HipHop will be around?
DJSS: Forever.
mia: Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
DJSS: Most definitely "Rapper's Delight" - someone played it at the preschool I went to.
mia: How did it make you feel?
DJSS:  I don't remember. I think I recall that it was very different from anything else I'd heard. And I remembered thinking it sounded like Chic's "Good Times." I specifically remember seeing the original orange label that it was pressed on, and seeing that spinning on the record player at my preschool.
mia: What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
DJSS: "Peter Piper" by Run DMC because it was the anti-song off of the Raising Hell LP. When the pop charts were eating up "Walk This Way," all the hardcore kids partied to "Peter Piper," plus that song really shows the genius of Jam Master Jay. "That's the Joint" by Funky Four Plus One More, cause it's the essence of the true school of hip hop & because it includes one of the early examples of the female MC. And "Rock the Bells" by LL Cool J, because it's just a classic that I love.
mia: Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
DJSS: That's hard, but I'll say Run DMC because I was around when they were trailblazing and it was a very special feeling to watch hip hop culture rise with them. They are the reason it has crossed over the way it has.
mia: Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
DJSS: n/a
mia: Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
DJSS: No - rap is the music and hip hop is the culture.
mia: What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
DJSS: n/a
mia: Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
DJSS: It's used in both ways - anything that is as massively popular today as hip hop will be exploited in all ways.
mia: Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
DJSS: Many of the songs today include that because everyone is trying to be more shocking, but it is damaging because it is targeted at young people (10 years old and younger) who have no business absorbing and understanding these types of images.
mia: Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
DJSS: I'm not sure - you'd have to specify what type of hip hop.
mia: Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
DJSS: Yes - because it's popular with young people.
mia: What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
DJSS: I think it's great.

OEJs

mia: Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
DJSS: Yes - all music transcends these things.
mia: Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
DJSS: I would have said yes 10 years ago, but today it's not even considered subversive or underground music/culture at all. It's pretty much mainstream for the most part. It's now integrated into all mainstream music programming. During the late 80s, you'd only see rap videos on MTV for 1 hour a week on it's own special show.
mia: Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
DJSS: Again, I would have said yes 10 or 20 years ago, but not today. It's way too popular and accepted by the mainstream.
mia: Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
DJSS: Most definitely.
mia: Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
DJSS: Because they don't have the marketing push behind them, the mainstream radio stations (which are mainly owned by conglomerates like Clear Channel, as opposed to being owned and controlled on a local/community level) are scared to give a shot to something that's not wildly popular at first, and because the artists give up too quickly.
mia: Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
DJSS: n/a




mia: Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
DJSS: No. This is wrong, but I'm a different kind of DJ anyway as I only play older music - nothing past 1986 and on vinyl only - so this would be an impossible scenario for me to be in.
mia: What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground?” series? Have you joined WHWN’s, if not why?

DJSS: Haven't joined it unfortunately, because I've found it difficult to keep up with all of the blogs and social media that I want to participate in.
mia: Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
DJSS: Because I was asked.
mia:  I really appreicate your taking the time to help me out.  Thank you.


WARDS OF NEW ORLEANS

You can find DJ Soul Sister at the following links:

MySpace - DJ Soul Sister
Facebook - DJ Soul Sister
Twitter - DJ Soul Sister
Please share your thoughts with us and let's keep this discussion going. There are many more interviews to come and as I always promise to deliver them, in the persons words unedited, without any bias.  This is a safe zone for us to talk so let's keep the discussion going! Follow the blog. Please share your thoughts with comments and of course pass this along to a friend!

Namaste.

Saturday, April 10, 2010

WHWN Ask What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop? Mun says, "It Seperates Artists & Stops Good Callobos"



WHWN ASK: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON HIPHOP?

It took a few for me to put my thoughts up here because what he said is so true: HipHop separates and it puts great artists together...Run DMC and Areosmith's "Walk This Way" is one of the best examples. I mean, how many great artists haven't performed together because of a beef or label dispute? HipHop has transcended all music to become the one sound or "stuff" that all music tries to emulate.HipHop is deeper than what anyone wants to admit.  It is as shallow as Darwin's gene pool and as deep as The Abyss.

Here is another artist I am proud to call my brotha, who's always keepin it all to real and all too funny at the same time.  Here is Muneco "Mun" Medina, as I always promise to do...in his words unedited or interrupted.  Enjoy!!

mia: What is your stage name?
Mun:  Muneco "Mun" Medina.
mia: Is the music industry your primary job?
Mun: Sure is.
mia:  In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
Mun: I'm an artist on Iron Work ent n we are independent.
mia: If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
Mun:  My life what I been thru, what I seen, my influences and of course the streets.
mia:  How long have you been in this profession?
Mun:  Over 8yrs.
mia:  What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
Mun:  HipHop is like my lil brother to me. I've seen it grow, change its style, friends and mature over the years.
mia:  What is HipHop to you?
Mun: HipHop to me is what artist like Mos Def, Talib , and The Roots are doing. Oh, and Common!





mia:  Do you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
Mun:  Of course HipHop can change a kids life if it is spoken the rite way.
mia:  Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
Mun:  Yes. Because I feel HipHop can change a lot of things about me for the better.
mia:  When do you think HipHop was born?
Mun:  In the Bronx as it has always been told.
mia:  What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
Mun: Too high to answer this one, sorry brain fart! lol
mia:  You a fool! Well, how often to you think about HipHop?
Mun:  Errrrrr day I wake up.
mia:  How long do you think HipHop will be around?
Mun: 4eva.
mia:  Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
Mun:  Yes. LL Cool J - "I'm Bad"
mia:  How did it make you feel?
Mun:  BAD!!!!!



mia:  What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
Mun:  "T.R.O.Y." - Pete Rock & Cl Smooth/Biggie - "Flava In ya Ear" remix/Nas - "If I ruled The World" = They are all a good time in HipHop.
mia:  Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
Mun:  For the moment I would have to say Drake besides myself!!! Dude is talented and can shine alone with out Lil Wayne.
mia:  Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
Mun:  I'm cool wit err body. I'll do a song wit you! Oh, I did!! lol
mia:  You a fool! Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
Mun:  Yeah beacuse its being used in the same form just spoken different.
mia:  What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
Mun: The beef. I feel as tho it seperates artist and stops good callobos.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
Mun: I think its used for whateva u want 2 tell the world about you or what u been thru, either u been thru good or bad or both.



mia:  Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
Mun: It's the lifestyle artist are trying 2 portey and people for some reason wanna hear about.
mia:  Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
Mun:  It can speak for them in diff ways, how they feeln, what they been thru, or where they wanna be.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
Mun:  HipHop sells everywhere it can b heard or seen, period!
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a commodity, and why?
Mun:  Another too high question!! lol
mia:  What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
Mun:  I think im one step closer to my dream.
mia: That's what's up!  Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
Mun:  Music is a universal language, if it sounds good everybody will luv it.
mia:  Great insight.  Why is HipHop used worldwide to advertise a wide variety of commodities?
Mun:  It's consumers range of all ages and race.
mia:  Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
Mun:  It can at times but its only so many ways u can use HipHop and get away with...th real heads know whats up!!!!
mia:  Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
Mun:  Yes. By wackness.
mia:  Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
Mun:  Look @ Common.
mia:  Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
Mun: People wanna hear what they are not supposed to hear, i guess lol
mia:  Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
Mun: $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
mia:  Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
Mun:  Yes i have. it was good because i got a chance to be heard i suppose
mia:  What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground?” series? Have you joined WHWN’s blog, if not why?
Mun: I fukn luv it!!! people wanna read about reall HipHop!!!
mia:  Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
Mun:  Because if I didnt Mia was gonna extra flood my twitter stream and talk bad about my mama!
mia:  ;D So, now the world knows you are crazy...sweet but totally crazy!!! Thanks Big Brauh for the interview.



You can find Mun at Iron Works Entertainment, on Facebook, Twitter at mr_medina, MySpace...you name it and he's there! But you gotta check out his latest hit at TwitTurn called "History."  Don't forget to Bless us with your comments! 

Holla atcha Gurl and let me know what you are thinking?? Stay Blessed!

Friday, February 5, 2010

WHWN Asks What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop: a.levy Smirkly Calls Out All HipHop Peepin Toms

In 2005, Katrina waters rose and damn near took out a culture of life in New Orleans.  With it the people who call it home, rose again and rebuilt. Some slower than others but nonetheless, they came home to put the pieces back together.  And now some are even proudly buying a home at home... like the brotha who is featured in this interview.

Let's fast forward to today, February 5, 2010 where the same city, who boost of a huge Superdome has a  pulse that has always chanted and cheered for the Black N Gold. Where kind hearted brothas, like a.levy, are getting their hustle on and I mean, really taking care of business. Which is the pulse of that same culture. I know you saw the last interviews...and places like Philly ain't no different either. 

For the first time in history, we are looking at HipHop as a culture, a religion, a way of life.  Just like we are witnessing the birth of the Super Bowl Saints and the transition into their prime.  All beating in the heart of New Orleans. 

Is it all a coincidence?  Naaaah. I don't think so... 
I think it has a lot to do with those peepin toms...

WHWN Asks What Are Your Thoughts on HipHop and the New Orleans native, a.levy, smirkly replies:

The same reason why "The Inside Man" was a bigger box office success then "Malcolm X" for Spike Lee. The majority does not want to see or hear anything that resembles reality. In the hood "Scarface" is the most watched movie and Soldier Slim is the most beloved N.O. artist. Ask those same people who Truth Universal or who Bionik Brown is and they’ll say they don’t know. Even in the suburbs they use HipHop music as a portal to peak into the “hood” without endangering themselves.

Damn. HipHop Peepin Toms. Let's roll.  Here are his thoughts in his words...


mia:  What is your stage name? What is your government name?
a.levy: .a.levy or Austin Levy
mia:  Is the music industry your primary job?
a.levy: Nope I wish
mia:  In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
a.levy: Myself
mia:  If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
a.levy:  HipHop
mia: How long have you been in this profession?
a.levy:  8 years 5 years professionally
mia: What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
a.levy:  I'm a rapper, an engineer, a studio owner and most importantly I'm a fan
mia:  What is HipHop to you?
a.levy:  Oxygen
mia: Do you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
a.levy:  Yes. To express whats going on in the inner cities and in the world.
mia:  Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
a.levy: Of course.my dress my talk my walk is all hiphop. I dream HipHhop dreams. lol
mia:  When do you think HipHop was born?
a.levy:  In the Middle Passage. lol. It's hard to tell if you ask me James Brown and Isaac Hayes was rapping.
mia: What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
a.levy:  It was created in testtube somewhere in New York in the 70’s
mia:  How often to you think about HipHop?
a.levy:  25-7 yes I said 25-7. lol.
mia:  How long do you think HipHop will be around?
a.levy:  Forever!
mia:  Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
a.levy:  Damn naaah I was real young. I heard 100’s of HipHop songs before I even knew what HipHop was. The radio raised me.lol
mia:  How did it make you feel?
a.levy:  idk
mia:  What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
a.levy:  WOWWWWW  This is a hard one. Nas, "If I Ruled the World" & "Undying Love," Eminems', "Stayin Eminem Till I Collapse." I have 100’s of favorite songs.
mia:  Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
a.levy:  Nas.  He is the most influential rapper on me and personal rap career. He was the creator of my epiphany moment.
mia:  Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
a.levy:  GucciSoldieroJPliesMinaJ I pilled them into ball and I'm rolling them off a cliff.  j/k that’s cruel.  lol. I enjoy thier music the least but they all appear to be good people just trying to make money off of the idiots that buy it.
mia:  Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
a.levy:  Hell no. HipHop is the roots the foundation rap is the stuff they package out in Japan for mass production. HipHop is organic and doesn’t have rules.
mia:  What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
a.levy:  Nothing…I take that back I wish the corporate machines would have ignored it a little longer and that we could have got another decade of great music.
mia:  Now that's what's up!!! Great thought. Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
a.levy:  Both there a good and bad with anything in life. Media uses it against us the justice system by using the lyrics of rappers against them. smh the actual artist in most cases use hiphop to provide income shelter and food for family members and friends sometimes those same people suck those artist dry but it is what it is.
mia:  Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
a.levy:  The same reason why "The Inside Man" was a bigger box office success then "Malcolm X" for Spike Lee. The majority does not want to see or hear anything that resembles reality. In the hood "Scarface" is the most watched movie and Soldier Slim is the most beloved N.O. artist. Ask those same people who Truth Universal or who Bionik Brown was and they’ll say they don’t know. Even in the suburbs they use HipHop music as a portal to peak into the “hood” without endangering themselves.
mia:  Shit, peepin toms that not only peep but steal? Damn, that's another great way to show the truth.


mia:  Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
a.levy:  Because its raw graphic blatant and it doesn’t apologize.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
a.levy:  Is Sam Cassel ugly? Of course. They listen to Tupac and Biggie in south Africa. In fact there are Japanese rappers African rappers. Rap and HipHop is everywhere.
mia:  Do you think HipHop is a commodity, and why?
a.levy:  Yes, but its dying.
mia:  What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
a.levy:  I love it. That gives me hope.
mia:  Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
a.levy:  Yep. The average Jay-Z concert is melting pot.
mia:  Why is HipHop used worldwide to advertise a wide variety of commodities?
a.levy:  Because it speaks to young people it's hip.
mia:  Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
a.levy:  Yes but not as bad as it used to be. Popular rap doesn’t have contend anymore. Why would the masses Hate rap? All they are doing is talking about being rich and dancing. Who doesn’t want to be rich?
mia:  Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
a.levy:  Definitely.  By the man! lol. The attack is over they have crippled the genre hiphop is a carcass now. It's on us to rebuild from the foundation up. When HipHop is flourishing “the man” will be back.
mia:  Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
a.levy:  Not a new artist. You need singles. As a conscious artist gold is double platinum. My advice get Kanye to produce all your tracks, i.e. Common "Be," and cross your fingers. Lupe’s not even platinum he’s a more polished conscious. Did I tell you I love Lupe? No Nobby.
mia:  Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
a.levy: “The man” is not putting millions of dollars behind Common, Kweli etc for radio spins, advertising, etc. If you don’t know it exists how can you but it. If you drop a bomb on commercial rap the radio will have to play something. Damn I miss the 90’s.
mia:  Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
a.levy:  Because that’s not what the label signed them for. The average artist is so far in debt to the label that they can't make what they want to make anyway.
mia:  Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
a.levy:  Nope never that’s a sin! It can be worth it I guess….in the current state of radio a local artist/drug dealer doesn’t have enough of money to even make a dent on radio.
mia:  What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground?” series?
a.levy:  I've read it. Great work!
mia:  Thanks. It is far from complete so stay tuned. I had to switch focus for a little bit as these interviews were just screaming to get out!!!
mia: Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
a.levy:  If it doesn’t hurt you it can only help you. Plus your pretty kool.
mia:  Thanks!!!  I really do appreciate your support!

Check out:

We charge $40 per hour to record.
To record an entire mixtape (recording and mixing) for $500.
a.levy is reached at @ALEVYWORLD on Twitter

Also available:
Crashed Harddrive - Mixtape
Thanks for reading. Be sure to leave your thoughts.

Namaste.

Friday, January 1, 2010

Your Thoughts on HipHop: ARapperNamedBilal says, "YOU Are My Least Favorite Artist!"

With such an inflamatory title, how do you start? Well of course, with an explanation:
"This May Offend Some of My Political Connects: If You Rap About Yourself...In Over 60% of Your Rhymes, YOU are My Least Favorite Artist!" ARapperNamedBilal
When he wanted me to open the interview with it, I knew it was on! When you check him out on on Twitter, you'll see he doesn't stop hittin folks up with the REAL. Hit him on Twitter at @Bilal504 or @GetRightMovment if you dare to have your mind expanded while he shares his great music with you. Oh, you haven't heard "A Playstation Cost More Than A Choppa?" You betta get it straight.

Throughout this series, God's being Blessing us with folks speaking, reppin, and being REAL without fear of retalliation from the sponsors, or labels for the powers that be but don't matter. Finally, another artist we really want to talk and listen to; someone we can actually have an intelligent conversation with and repoire. Finally, another voice with meaning and substenance. I mean shit man, FINALLY!

WHWN ASK: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON HIPHOP?


by mia harris, Canal St. Louisiana, 05/2009

Here is the answers in his words...

mia: What is your stage name?
ARNB: ARapperNamedBilal
mia: What is your government name?
ARNB: Bilal Abdul-Hakeem
mia: Is the music industry your primary job?
ARNB: Not at the moment. I'm also a barber.
mia: In the music industry, who do you work for? Or are you independent?
ARNB: I'm independent. The name of my label is INTRAKIT.ent.
mia: If you are a DJ, producer, writer or an artist what is your content?
ARNB: I am a writer and an artist; I try to keep most of my content about issues that are affecting poor or oppressed people.
mia: How long have you been in this profession?
ARNB: I wrote my first rap in '84.
mia: What is your relationship with HipHop and music in general?
ARNB: My heart beats to the rhythm of the drum.
mia: What is HipHop to you?
ARNB: Life.
mia: Do you think HipHop has a purpose and what?
ARNB: Its purpose is to unify people of all walks of life. To inform you about your surroundings. To introduce you to new ways of thinking. And make you dance.
mia: Are you influenced by HipHop and why?
ARNB: Yes. When I first heard it, it was something about it that just felt natural. Like I had heard it B4 or something.
mia: When do you think HipHop was born?
ARNB: B4 we even came to this country.


by mia harris, Venice Beach, CA 07/2009

mia: What is your understanding of the birth of HipHop as a music genre?
ARNB: When the Sugar Hill Gang became the first HipHop artist to reach the charts. But rapping can be heard as far back as the 20's with Louis Armstrong (born in New Orleans) and Cab Calloway.
mia: How often to you think about HipHop?
ARNB: ADED <==== Yall should be able to figure dat out.
mia: How long do you think HipHop will be around?
ARNB: As long as music is around there will be HipHop.
mia: Do you remember the first HipHop song you heard?
ARNB: Rapper's Delight by the Sugar Hill Gang.
mia: How did it make you feel?
ARNB: Made me feel like dancing and repeating what dey said
mia: What are your 3 most favorite HipHop songs and why?
ARNB: In no particular order..."They Want EFX," by Das EFX 1992: Because dey weren't really saying anything but at the same time dey were saying a lot and it was new and sounded damn good. Plus I used to make bets that I could rap the whole song and people always thought I couldn't. "Ha," by Juvenile 1999: It put together the whole vibe of the street life of New Orleans at the time. If you wasn't living what he was rapping about you definitely was close to someone who was going through it. It also put a lot of New Orleans slang and swag into the international vocabulary. Woadies everywhere began to be seen more often wearing white tees, white sneakers, and blue jeans. Blinged out headbussas everywhere. "I Aint No Joke," by Eric B & Rakim 1987: No explanation needed.
mia: Who is your favorite HipHop artist and why?
ARNB: Tupac....Because even though he was considered a gangsta rapper he still made music that had positive messages and he expressed solutions for solving some of our community problems.
mia: Who is your least favorite HipHop artist and why?
ARNB: If you rap about yourself, what you can do, or what you have in over 60% of your rhymes YOU are my least favorite artist! Doesn't mean you can't rap. But when I listen to music, I don't want to hear you talk about yourself all the time.
mia: Do you think Rap and HipHop are the same and why?
ARNB: HipHop is the culture; rap is a part of the HipHop culture. HipHop is DJing, break dancing, pop locking, its how you dress, communicate etc......When your just rapping you can rap about anything, but if you call your rap HipHop, then you must be saying something that can effect the listeners in a positive way. (HIPHOP IS NOT NEGATIVE)


"Ya Hear Me?" by mia harris, Canal St., Louisiana, 05/2009

mia: What, if any, would you change about HipHop?
ARNB: HipHop will be what it must be at all times. In other words what HipHop is going through right now seems needed. So much garbage is in the mainstream now that people are really starting to miss the REAL. So when the REAL returns it's gonna be almost impossible for it to leave again. So I guess the answer is NO
mia: Do you think HipHop is used positively or negatively, and why?
ARNB: HipHop cannot be negative, rap can be but not HipHop.
mia: Why do you think most HipHop videos and songs are filled with stunting, sexism and violence?
ARNB: Because someone put the wrong label on the video or song, it should be labeled a rap video not HipHop.
mia: Why do people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds like HipHop?
ARNB: It's a natural vibe. It's undeniable.
mia: Do you think HipHop is a global industry and why?
ARNB: Yes because it's used to sell products on all continents.
mia: Do you think HipHop is a commodity, and why?
ARNB: A HipHop song can be packaged as a commodity but the culture itself cannot be sold.
mia: What do you think when you hear of people in third-world countries, bumping HipHop?
ARNB: I think it's natural and so powerful that if we moved to outter space, we would be rapping on Mars.
mia: Do you think HipHop transcends all languages, cultures and boundaries, and why?
ARNB: I know it does. Because I saw a group of grandmas 60+ in Beijing using HipHop dance moves as exercise. ;D
mia: Why is HipHop used worldwide to advertise a wide variety of commodities?
ARNB: Because people around the world can relate to HipHop in some kind of way.
mia: Do you think HipHop has a negative perception in the media, and why?
ARNB: The media is run by the devil and the devil knows the power of HipHop music. So what the media does is focus on the negativity instead of the thousands of positive HipHop artists out there.
mia: Do you think HipHop is under attack, if so why and by what?
ARNB: Yep, because they know that HipHop has the power to free minds and that is something they don't want. It is, and will continue to be, under attack by HipHop police, FCC, Right-Wing Liberal Whack Jobs, a.k.a. the devil.
mia: Do you think a person can stay conscious and achieve platinum success?
ARNB: Yeah because HipHop is making its way back to being REAL (watch me).


photo by WhiteBoi, SoundClash 2008

mia: Why do you think is it more difficult for conscious artists to cross over?
ARNB: Dey don’t get enough publicity.
mia: Why do you think it is more difficult for a platinum artist to produce content of value and keep the support of their labels and radio stations?
ARNB: Most radio stations are apart of dat media I was speaking of earlier. If the devil can keep your mind on bullshit then dats what he will do. So a good way to keep your mind on bullshit is to play bullshit songs on the radio all day. You are what you think, and most of us thinks about music all day...whether good or bad.
mia: Did you or have you ever paid (or received money) to have a song played on the radio/TV? If so, do you think it is right or wrong, a necessity or not and why?
ARNB: I haven’t got paid for my songs being played on the radio yet but I will shortly.
mia: What is your opinion of the “Where Do You Stand: Why Platinum Artists Flee Underground” series?
ARNB: I think it raises important questions to gauge the thoughts of HipHop lovers, haters, & in-betweeners.
mia: Why did you take out time to complete the survey?
ARNB: Because I love HipHop and I would like to be apart of preserving the culture.


by mia harris, Venice Beach, CA 07/2009



ARapperNamedBilal's ShoutOut 2 WHWN 01/2010

Wow! Here is another knockout coming from ARapperNamedBilal and yours truly. We hope you've enjoyed. Now talk to us! Let us know what you think! This is a conversation, not a dialogue. Let's grow...

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